How long is forever? Sometimes, just one second. 

Bedtime selfie! 

It’s been a tiring but love-filled day, but not in any obvious way. 

I found myself lost in thought about those little but very special moments in life. These moments are often fleeting, are buried in the minutiae of life and yet they sparkle with the piercing brilliance of tiny stars on black velvet. There is still beauty in everything.

I remembered life is but a brief moment. The years go by quickly and if we’re lucky and make it that far, old age arrives suddenly before we have an inkling. People desire so many things and waste their days in vain. Some yearn for gold, others for power, yet others for glory and a higher station. But when death’s moment nears and they look back at the lives they’ve lived, they realise they’ve been happy only during those moments when they’ve loved.

How long is forever? Sometimes, just one second.

Happy Easter, to you all 🙂 
(Photo shot with VSCO)

Kahlil Gibran: On Reason and Passion

Posted from: Vale of Glamorgan CF61 1ZH, UK

Your soul is often at times a battlefield, upon which your reason and your judgment wage war against your passion and your appetite.
Would that I could be the peacemaker in your soul, that I might turn the discord and the rivalry of your elements into oneness and melody.
But how shall I, unless you yourselves be also the peacemakers, nay, the lovers of all your elements?

Your reason and your passion are the rudder and the sails of your seafaring soul. If either your sails or your rudder be broken, you can but toss and drift, or else be held at a standstill in mid-seas.
For reason, ruling alone, is a force confining; and passion, unattended, is a flame that burns to its own destruction.
Therefore let your soul exalt your reason to the height of passion, that it may sing;
And let it direct your passion with reason, that your passion may live through its own daily resurrection, and like the phoenix rise above its own ashes.

I would have you consider your judgment and your appetite even as you would two loved guests in your house.
Surely you would not honour one guest above the other; for he who is more mindful of one loses the love and the faith of both. Among the hills, when you sit in the cool shade of the white poplars, sharing the peace and serenity of distant fields and meadows – then let your heart say in silence, “God rests in reason.”
And when the storm comes, and the mighty wind shakes the forest, and thunder and lightning proclaim the majesty of the sky – then let your heart say in awe, “God moves in passion.”
And since you are a breath in God’s sphere, and a leaf in God’s forest, you too should rest in reason and move in passion.

Khalil Gibran

Kahlil Gibran: On Pain – “Much of your pain is self-chosen…”

Your pain is the breaking of the shell that encloses your understanding.

Even as the stone of the fruit must break, that its heart may stand in the sun, so must you know pain.
And could you keep your heart in wonder at the daily miracles of your life, your pain would not seem less wondrous than your joy;
And you would accept the seasons of your heart, 
even as you have always accepted the seasons that pass over your fields.
And you would watch with serenity through the winters of your grief.
Much of your pain is self-chosen.
It is the bitter potion by which the physician within you heals your sick self. 
Therefore trust the physician, and drink his remedy in silence and tranquillity:
For his hand, though heavy and hard, is guided by the tender hand of the Unseen,
And the cup he brings, though it burn your lips, 
has been fashioned of the clay which the Potter has moistened with His own sacred tears.

– Kahlil Gibran
Image © Dr. Franky Dolan

Khalil Gibran

Kahlil Gibran: On Joy & Sorrow [with a personal reflection]

Posted from: Vale of Glamorgan CF61 1ZH, UK

Your joy is your sorrow unmasked.
And the selfsame well from which your laughter rises was often times filled with your tears.
And how else can it be?
The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain.
Is not the cup that holds your wine the very cup that was burned in the potter’s oven?
And is not the lute that soothes your spirit, the very wood that was hollowed with knives?
When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy.
When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight.

Some of you say, “Joy is greater thar sorrow,” and others say, “Nay, sorrow is the greater.”
But I say unto you, they are inseparable.
Together they come, and when one sits, alone with you at your board, remember that the other is asleep upon your bed. Verily you are suspended like scales between your sorrow and your joy.
Only when you are empty are you at standstill and balanced.
When the treasure-keeper lifts you to weigh his gold and his silver, needs must your joy or your sorrow rise or fall.

Khalil Gibran

• • •In this poem ‘Joy & Sorrow’, Kahlil Gibran likens the two as being inseparable. He beautifully encapsulated this conflict so wonderfully and succinctly. Even in this pain, there is a sense of wonder and bewilderment that the heart can feel a depth of sorrow by the very same instrument that delivered the sense of abounding happiness in the first place. 

It is a curious, baffling sensation. Where he used to be, there is a hole in the world, which I find myself constantly wandering around in lost the daytime, and falling into its depths at night. My knees are skinned from falling down into the unforgiving, cavernous abyss which he left behind.When hearts break, the scar-tissue and calluses on the heart amount to wisdom with time, or so we are told… If only that time would come sooner for healing to begin. Until then, I rest, and I hope that there really is hope, and I try… and I wait…

Contra Omnia Discrimina